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Posts for tag: root canal

By Michael J. Tisdelle DDS
October 13, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
YourDecayedToothMightNeedaDifferentKindofRootCanalTreatment

Advanced decay doesn't necessarily mean it's curtains for an infected tooth. Millions of teeth in that condition have been saved by a tried and true procedure called root canal therapy.

Although they may vary according to the complexity of a case, all root canal procedures share some similarities. After numbing the tooth and gum areas with local anesthesia, the procedure begins with a small hole drilled into the tooth to access the infected pulp and root canals, tiny passageways inside the root.

The dentist then uses special instruments to clear out infected tissue from the pulp and canals, followed by thoroughly sanitizing the resulting empty spaces. This is followed with filling the pulp chamber and root canals with a rubber-like substance (gutta percha) to seal the interior of the tooth from further infection. Later, the dentist typically crowns the tooth for further protection and support.

Root canals have become the standard treatment for teeth with advanced decay. There are, however, some circumstances where performing a root canal isn't a good idea. For example, a previously root-canaled tooth with a crown and supporting post. A dentist would need to fully disassemble the restoration to gain access into the tooth, which could significantly weaken it.

But there may be another option if a standard root canal is out of the picture: a surgical procedure performed by an endodontist (a specialist in interior tooth treatment) called an apicoectomy. Instead of drilling through the tooth crown, the endodontist accesses the tooth root through the adjacent gum tissue.

Like a traditional root canal, the procedure begins by anesthetizing the tooth and surrounding gums. The endodontist then makes a small incision through the gums to expose the diseased tissues at the tooth's root. After removing the infected tissue and a few millimeters of the root tip, they place a small filling to seal the end of the root canal against infection and suture the gum incision.

This is a specialized procedure that requires the state-of-the-art equipment and advanced techniques of an endodontist. But it does provide another possible option for saving a diseased tooth that might otherwise be lost.

If you would like more information on treatments for tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Apicoectomy: A surgical Option When Root Canal Treatment Fails.”

By Michael J. Tisdelle DDS
August 04, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
DontFeartheRootCanal-ItCouldJustSaveYourTooth

Root canals often get a bum rap. Although the procedure saves millions of teeth every year, it's often erroneously portrayed as an unpleasant experience. And if that wasn't enough, a long-discredited medical theory has found new life on the internet asserting root canals are a health danger.

First off, root canals play an immensely important role in treating teeth with advanced decay. If not promptly treated, a cavity can turn into a major infection of the interior tooth pulp and root canals, and ultimately the supporting bone. Teeth with this level of decay are not long for this world.

A root canal treatment stops this disease process in its tracks. After numbing the tooth and surrounding gums, we drill a small hole into the tooth's interior and then remove all of the infected tissue within the pulp and root canals. After disinfecting these areas, we fill them with a rubber-like substance called gutta percha.

After sealing off the access hole—and later capping the tooth with a life-like crown—the tooth is secure from further decay. And, by the way, the procedure doesn't hurt, thanks to local anesthesia. If anything, any pain caused by the decay attacking the tooth's nerves has now been alleviated.

So, what about the idea floating on the Web that root canals are dangerous? The "root" for this conjecture is a theory by Weston Price, an early 20th Century dentist, that leaving a "dead" body part in the body leads to various health problems (including cancer). That would include a root-canaled tooth, which has had the living tissue in the pulp removed.

There's just one problem—Weston's theory was fully investigated in the 1950s and overwhelmingly discredited. The supposed cancer threat was also reviewed in a 2013 study, which found no link between root canals and increased cancer risk. In fact, dental patients who had undergone several root canals had a diminished risk.

Like all other health procedures, root canals have some risks of complication. But those complications are far from life-threatening—it's tooth-saving benefits are often worth the risk. So, fear not if your dentist says you need a root canal. It won't hurt and it won't endanger your health—and it could save your tooth.

If you would like more information on root canal therapy, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Safety.”

By Michael J. Tisdelle DDS
June 11, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

Are you suffering from severe constant pain in one tooth or more? Does eating or drinking hot or cold foods or drinks exaggerate this pain? If your answer is yes, then you may need a root canal treatment, fortunately, this is one of the services that is offered by your Charlottesville, VA, dentist Dr. Michael Tisdelle.

What is root canal treatment?

Toothache, filling leakage, or any damage in the teeth due to accidents will make it possible for the bacteria that live naturally in the mouth to grow inside the tooth reaching the soft tissue which is called the dental pulp causing infection. This bacterial infection will cause pulp inflammation, which will further increase the bacterial growth, so we must remove these microorganisms from the teeth, this is best done using a root canal.

At the beginning of the procedure, Dr. Tisdelle will make a small hole in your tooth, and then using special instruments, your Charlottesville, VA, dentist will extract any dead or dying tissues and clean the canals thoroughly making sure that they become bacteria-free, this is followed by the addition of inert filling to close the canal, and finally, the opening will be closed using adhesive cement to prevent any future infections. During the whole process, you will be under the effect of a local anesthetic which makes the procedure comfortable. Finally, your tooth will be protected by a new dental crown.

Signs that you need a root canal.

One of the most obvious signs is the severe continuous pain that escalates with eating, chewing, or drinking, especially if the foods or drinks are extremely hot or cold. Also, gum swelling may present and may develop into facial swelling. In the advanced stages of the pulp damage, puss may be seen as well as teeth darkening in color.

if you are suffering from one or more of these signs please don’t ignore them, because if you don’t have a root canal at the right time you are at risk of losing your tooth.

You can save your teeth with root canal therapy. Call your Charlottesville, VA, dentist Dr. Tisdelle at (434) 977-4101 and book your appointment now!

By Michael J. Tisdelle DDS
June 05, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
DontBeWaryofaRootCanal-HeresHowItCouldSaveYourTooth

Here's the bad news: One of your teeth has tooth decay. But here's even worse news: The decay has entered the pulp and root canals in the heart of the tooth. You're well on your way to losing that tooth.

But cheer up—root canal therapy might save your decayed tooth. We use root canal therapy to remove the infection from within a tooth and then fill the resulting empty spaces to prevent further infection. This routine procedure has saved millions of teeth.

But alas, along the way root canals somehow became a cultural symbol for unpleasantness. In reality, there's nothing further from the truth—the procedure itself is painless, and may even stop any pain caused by tooth decay.

So, let's take the mystery out of root canal therapy—the more you know, the less wary you'll feel. Here's what to expect if you undergo this tooth-saving procedure.

Preparation. We start by numbing the tooth and surrounding gums with local anesthesia. While we're waiting for the anesthesia to take full effect, we isolate the tooth with a dental dam to prevent cross-contamination to other teeth.

Access. Next, we drill a small opening into the tooth to access the pulp and root canals. If it's one of the large back teeth, we drill the hole in the tooth's biting surface; in a narrower front tooth, we make the access opening in the rear surface.

Removal. We remove tissue from the pulp and root canals using special instruments. Afterward, we thoroughly disinfect the pulp and canal interiors with an antibacterial solution to ensure we've stopped the infection.

Filling. After re-shaping the root canals, we fill them and the pulp chamber with gutta percha, a rubber-like material ideal for this type of dental situation. We then fill and seal the access hole. In a few weeks, you'll return to have a permanent crown installed to further protect the tooth.

You may have some minor discomfort that's usually manageable with mild pain relievers, and should dissipate over a few days. The good news, though, is that we've more than likely saved a tooth that might have otherwise been lost.

If you would like more information on treating a decayed tooth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”

By Michael J. Tisdelle DDS
December 10, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

A root canal could help save your inflamed or infected tooth. The procedure, one of the many treatments offered by your Charlottesville, VA, dentist, Dr. Michael Tisdelle, eliminates your pain and helps you avoid the loss of your tooth.

Why root canals are needed

Root canals treat inflammation in your tooth pulp caused by extensive decay, injuries, and bacterial infections. If the pulp isn't removed and replaced during root canal therapy, you'll eventually lose your tooth.

Root canals also protect your health if you have an abscess. The bacterial infection that caused the abscess can enter your bloodstream and travel to your heart, brain, and other organs without prompt treatment. In addition to receiving a root canal, you'll also need to take antibiotics if you have an abscess.

What happens during a root canal?

Root canal therapy doesn't have a very good reputation. In fact, 57 percent of adults surveyed by the American Association of Endodontists in 2019 reported that they were more afraid of root canals than spiders. Although receiving a root canal may have been a painful experience many years ago, that's no longer the case. Advances in dental technology and pain control have made the procedure no more difficult than getting a dental filling.

Before the root canal begins, your dentist will use a local anesthetic to numb your mouth. The procedure won't start until you're comfortably numb and can't feel any pain.

After your tooth is opened, your dentist will remove the pulp and clean the interior of the tooth, including the root canals that extend from the top of the tooth to the roots. Tiny files make cleaning and shaping the narrow canals much easier. He may also add an antibiotic to the tooth to kill any lingering bacteria before adding a temporary filling to the tooth.

You'll return to the office in a week or two to receive your permanent filling. Gutta-percha, a rubber-based filling material, is often used to permanently fill teeth treated with root canal therapy. A dental crown may also be recommended to strengthen your treated tooth. You'll visit the Charlottesville dental office at a later date to receive your crown.

After your root canal, your tooth will function normally and you'll no longer have to live with tooth pain.

Do you think you may need a root canal? Call your dentist in Charlottesville, VA, Dr. Michael Tisdelle, at (434) 977-4101 to schedule your appointment.